Stance

Stance, the placement of your feet, knees and hips, supports your entire vocal body. As your voice grows you will need a solid base of physical support. Expert breathing relies upon a grounded and aligned posture.

  • Stance - Proper placement of feet, knees and hips
  • Sitting Position

Stance

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Stance

Your stance provides structural support from the ground up.

The placement and coordination of your feet, knees and hips provide the structural support for your new voice and breathing techniques.

The positions you learn for your feet, knees and hips in this lesson will begin to unwind unhealthy tension in the lower body and strengthen the core muscles that support your vocal body.

This new position may not feel comfortable at first, but it is the optimum position to unlock small movements in the bucket of your pelvis, legs, and torso that provide even more structural strength for your voice.

Change and Time

An aligned stance creates a fundamental shift in how you move through and present yourself in the world.

You may not feel comfortable or natural at first, but it is a certain point of balance.  it will become habitual with consistent repetition over time.

Please don’t expect great change and correct stance to consistently occur in one day, or even one week.

However, soon, with slow, step-by-step attention to your stance, you will notice a change in your balance and posture.

A New Balance Point

This stance realigns your orientation to the ground and changes your balance. You may find, at first, that your whole body may wiggle and twitch to find its new, comfortable balance point.

Pay attention to these small adjustments, as they are telling you that your body is moving into position.

Feet

Your feet are parallel and pointing forwards, about hip-width apart.

Look down at your feet and notice your normal standing position. Then slowly bring your feet to a parallel position.

Knees

Your knees face forward and are slightly bent. There should be an imaginary line from your knees to your ankles

Just under your knee cap there is a little knob. Locate the second toe in from your big toe and draw an imaginary line from the second toe up to your knob on your knee.

Hips

Your knees face forward and are slightly bent. There should be an imaginary line from your knees to your ankles

Just under your knee cap there is a little knob. Locate the second toe in from your big toe and draw an imaginary line from the second toe up to your knob on your knee.

Line from Feet to Ankles and Hips

Your knees face forward and are slightly bent. There should be an imaginary line from your knees to your ankles

Just under your knee cap there is a little knob.

Locate the second toe in from your big toe and draw an imaginary line from the second toe up to your knob on your knee.

This is an example of how NOT to stand. This is a major shift in your posture and requires you to pay attention. It probably doesn't feel comfortable at first, but with patience, you whole body will re-adjust.

This placement of your feet will affect your hips AND the range of motion of your diaphragm.

Sitting Position

  • Find a chair that allow you to place your feet flat on the floor.
  • Set your feet parallel at hip width apart.
  • Come forward on your chair until the line between your bottom and legs meets the end of the chair. There should be a horizontal line from your knees to your hips.
  • Align the second toes in a straight line to the knob under your knee cap.

Exercise

1. Place yourself in either proper sitting or standing stance.

Standing:

  • Place feet in parallel position
  • Ankles under the knees
  • Knees under the hips
  • Horizontal line of hips

Sitting:

Sit forward on your chair.

  • Horizontal line from hips to knees.
  • Vertical line from knees to ankles.

2. Open the Vocal Core

Look into your mirror and check for the following:

  • Mouth closed with lips relaxed
  • Sides of lips gently brought up into an easy, relaxed smile
  • Eyes open in a soft gaze
  • Eyebrows relaxed and don’t move when you smile
  • Head is relaxed and there is a horizontal line between the ears
  • Jaw falls from the face and there is a slight space between the teeth
  • Back of head is soft, without tension
  • Breath is silent, which indicates a relaxed larynx
  • Air moves in and out of upper body without extra effort.
  • Vocabulary

    • HOLD - To use tension to sustain a position. Instead, you will find the proper position and allow it to remain in place.
    • STANCE - The proper placement of feet to the hips. Feet are parallel and placed under the knees and hip in a straight line. Knees are slightly bend and facing forward.
    • SITTING POSTURE - Feet flat upon the floor. Knees face forward. Knees are over your ankles. There is a 90 degree angle from your knees to your lower legs.
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